The grandson of Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter reportedly gave an update on their health, saying, “We’re in the final chapter.”

“My grandparents have always been the entertainers,” Josh Carter told People magazine in an interview published Saturday. “But now we’re kind of the ones having to entertain. It’s different, it’s just a different era.”

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Jimmy Carter’s health update

CNN reported that former President Jimmy Carter entered hospice care in February. Since then, Josh Carter has said, “He’s still fully Jimmy Carter,” but then went on to elaborate, “I mean he’s almost 99 years old, but he fully understands (how many well wishes he’s received) and has felt the love.”

Josh Carter reportedly told news outlets that as his grandparents age, “there’s always someone at his grandparents’ home, usually one of their four kids.”

Today reported that among Jimmy Carter’s health history, the most notable illnesses and ailments are:

  • In 2015, Carter was diagnosed and treated for metastatic melanoma.
  • In 2019, Carter experienced a few falls.
  • In 2019, Carter had surgery “to relieve pressure on his brain.”
  • In 2023, Carter entered in-home hospice care.

As for the former first lady, Rosalynn Carter is standing by her husband’s side through her own dementia diagnosis, according to Vanity Fair.

Josh Carter reportedly said that his grandmother “still knows who we are, for the most part — that we are family.”

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Who is the longest-living president of the United States?

Jimmy Carter became the longest-living U.S. president when he surpassed George H.W. Bush, who lived to be 94 years old.

While Carter is currently 98 years old, his grandson Hugo Wentzel told Entertainment Weekly earlier this month that “he always wants to be doing something with his mind, so he’s trying to keep himself busy, but he is really sick and getting older.”

Jennifer Graham wrote for the Deseret News in February that, as Carter had decided to go into hospice care, he would be regarded by his supporters as “a national treasure.”