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Ridgecrest Elementary School fifth graders stack cups during a sport stacking competition at the school in Cottonwood Heights on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021. In sport stacking, contestants race to be the first to stack a predetermined number of cups in a predetermined arrangement, and then “down stack” or unstack them. The students from Ridgecrest joined stackers from around in the world in an attempt to break the 2019 record of 638,503 stackers. The goal this year was to have 645,000 stackers. Stacking has become an international phenomenon that has risen to the level of a Junior Olympics event.
Ridgecrest Elementary School fifth graders stack cups during a sport stacking competition at the school in Cottonwood Heights on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021. In sport stacking, contestants race to be the first to stack a predetermined number of cups in a predetermined arrangement, and then “down stack” or unstack them. The students from Ridgecrest joined stackers from around in the world in an attempt to break the 2019 record of 638,503 stackers. The goal this year was to have 645,000 stackers. Stacking has become an international phenomenon that has risen to the level of a Junior Olympics event.
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

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Photo of the day: It all stacks up — Utah students compete in annual challenge

Does the term sport stacking sound familiar?

How about cup stacking? Or speed stacking?

No? Well it’s a sport where contestants race to be the first to stack a predetermined number of cups in a predetermined arrangement, and then “down stack” or unstack them. More than a hobby, stacking has become an international phenomenon that has risen to the level of a Junior Olympics event.

There’s even a World Sport Stacking Association that holds sanctioned competitions and sponsors an annual Stack Up! challenge to break the the association’s world record for “The Most People Stacking at Multiple Locations.”

This year, a group of fifth graders at Ridgecrest at Elementary School in Cottonwood Heights joined stackers from around in the globe — Hungary, Germany, Israel, South Korea, New Zealand, Colombia and Taiwan — in attempting to break the 2019 record of 638,503 stackers. The goal this year is to have 645,000 stackers.

There’s no word yet from the association as to whether the record was broken.

Ridgecrest Elementary School fifth graders stack cups during a sport stacking competition at the school in Cottonwood Heights on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021. In sport stacking, contestants race to be the first to stack a predetermined number of cups in a predetermined arrangement, and then “down stack” or unstack them. The students from Ridgecrest joined stackers from around in the world in an attempt to break the 2019 record of 638,503 stackers. The goal this year was to have 645,000 stackers. Stacking has become an international phenomenon that has risen to the level of a Junior Olympics event.
Ridgecrest Elementary School fifth graders stack cups during a sport stacking competition at the school in Cottonwood Heights on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021. In sport stacking, contestants race to be the first to stack a predetermined number of cups in a predetermined arrangement, and then “down stack” or unstack them. The students from Ridgecrest joined stackers from around in the world in an attempt to break the 2019 record of 638,503 stackers. The goal this year was to have 645,000 stackers. Stacking has become an international phenomenon that has risen to the level of a Junior Olympics event.
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News
Ridgecrest Elementary School fifth graders watch their stacked cups fall as they participate in a sport stacking competition at the school in Cottonwood Heights on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021. In sport stacking, contestants race to be the first to stack a predetermined number of cups in a predetermined arrangement, and then “down stack” or unstack them. The students from Ridgecrest joined stackers from around in the world in an attempt to break the 2019 record of 638,503 stackers. The goal this year was to have 645,000 stackers. Stacking has become an international phenomenon that has risen to the level of a Junior Olympics event.
Ridgecrest Elementary School fifth graders watch their stacked cups fall as they participate in a sport stacking competition at the school in Cottonwood Heights on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021. In sport stacking, contestants race to be the first to stack a predetermined number of cups in a predetermined arrangement, and then “down stack” or unstack them. The students from Ridgecrest joined stackers from around in the world in an attempt to break the 2019 record of 638,503 stackers. The goal this year was to have 645,000 stackers. Stacking has become an international phenomenon that has risen to the level of a Junior Olympics event.
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News
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