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Utah (again) is not one of the worst states for driving

You might feel differently, but a new report suggests Utah is about middle-of-the-road when it comes to driving

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Vehicles travel on I-15 in northern Utah County.

Vehicles travel on I-15 in northern Utah County in 2020. A recent report listed Utah as in the middle of the pack when ranking the worst states for driving habits.

Utah Department of Transportation

A new report from WalletHub did not rank Utah among the worst states for driving, placing the Beehive State about in the middle of the road when it comes to driving habits.

The news: WalletHub released its annual report on the best and worst states for driving by measuring every state against 31 key metrics, including average gas prices, rush hour traffic and road quality.

The best: The top states for driving include:

  1. Iowa.
  2. Oklahoma.
  3. Kansas.
  4. North Carolina.
  5. Texas.
  6. Georgia.
  7. Wisconsin.
  8. Tennessee.
  9. Illinois.
  10. Indiana.

The worst: Which states ranked among the worst? Here are the rankings:

  1. Hawaii.
  2. Rhode Island.
  3. Delaware.
  4. California.
  5. Maryland.
  6. Washington.
  7. Colorado.
  8. Michigan.
  9. Missouri.
  10. Wyoming.

Utah’s ranking: The Beehive State finished at No. 26 on the list, ranking behind Arizona, Arkansas, South Dakota and Florida. Utah ranked higher than Vermont, New Mexico, Mississippi and Louisiana.

Flashback: This isn’t all that surprising. Back in 2018, I reported that Utah ranked as the 26th worst place to drive in the same report.

More details: The morning commute might help Utah’s ranking. A 2018 report from the Deseret News’ Katie McKellar found Utahns take under an hour for their morning commute.

  • Utah drivers appear to be less distracted. In fact, a study from Zendrive found Utah was the eighth least-distracted state when it comes to driving, with drivers spending 4.23% of their day looking at their phones while driving. Drivers in the least-distracted state, Oregon, spent 3.69% of their day on their phones.