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FOR MANY, POST-WATERGATE LIFE INCLUDED PRISON, WRITING

SHARE FOR MANY, POST-WATERGATE LIFE INCLUDED PRISON, WRITING

In their lives after Watergate, many of those who played prominent roles in the Nixon administration, in the scandal that prematurely ended a presidency, or in investigating and uncovering the crimes of Watergate became authors.

Here are some major figures from that era and where they are today.- Former President Richard M. Nixon resigned in August 1974 and received a full pardon from his successor, Gerald R. Ford, for any crimes he might have committed while in office. He has since written nine books, including his memoirs, and occasionally appears at speaking engagements and television interviews. He lives with his wife, Pat, in Park Ridge, N.J.

- Former Vice President Spiro Agnew resigned in 1973 after an investigation into bribery and kickback allegations resulted in his pleading no contest to tax evasion. He received a three-year suspended prison term. He has since worked as a consultant for Middle East interests and lives in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

- Henry Kissinger, former national security adviser and secretary of state, runs his own international consulting firm based in New York. He occasionally appears in television interviews as an expert in foreign affairs.

- H.R. Haldeman, former White House chief of staff who served 18 months of a 21/2- to 8-year prison term in the Watergate coverup. He has since written one book, "The Ends of Power," and lives in Santa Barbara, Calif., where he works in real estate and advises several small businesses in which he has partial ownership.

- John Ehrlichman, former Nixon domestic counselor who served 18 months of a 21/2- to 8-year prison term in the Watergate coverup. He has written six books and is currently writing a novel on the impeachment of a president. He recently moved to Atlanta, where he works as an executive for an international consulting company.

- Charles W. Colson, former special counsel to the president who served 207 days of a 1- to 3-year term for obstruction of justice in connection with the break-in at the office of Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist. He founded and serves as chairman of Prison Fellowship, a Christian counseling outreach that operates in more than 600 prisons. He has written several books, including "Born Again," and writes a monthly column. He lives in northern Virginia.

- G. Gordon Liddy, former White House aide and counsel for the financial arm of Nixon's re-election committee who served 52 months of a 6- to 20-year sentence in the Watergate burglary. The sentence was later commuted to eight years by President Jimmy Carter. He hosts a radio talk show on WJFK-FM in Washington.

- E. Howard Hunt, former White House aide and counsel for the financial arm of Nixon's re-election committee who served 32 months of a 21/2- to 8-year sentence for burglary, conspiracy and wiretapping in the Watergate burglary. He lectures, writes spy novels and lives in Miami.

- Jeb Stuart Magruder, the deputy director of Nixon's re-election campaign who served 218 days of a 10-month to four-year sentence in the coverup. He later earned a master's degree from the Princeton Theological Seminary and is a minister at a Presbyterian church in Lexington, Ky.

- Alexander M. Haig Jr., Nixon's last chief of staff and Ronald Reagan's first secretary of state. He operates his own international consulting company in Washington.

- Dwight L. Chapin, former presidential appointments secretary who served 235 days of a 10- to 30-month sentence for lying to a grand jury. He later served as publisher of Success magazine. He lives in Connecticut.

- John N. Mitchell, the former attorney general and head of Nixon's re-election committee who served 19 months of a 21/2- to 8-year sentence in the Watergate coverup. He died in 1988.

- John Dean, the presidential counsel who served 127 days of a 1-to 4-year sentence in the coverup. He wrote a best-selling book, "Blind Ambition," and lives in Los Angeles.

- Herbert W. Kalmbach, Nixon's personal lawyer who served 191 days of 6-to 18-month sentence for campaign law violations. He later returned to his law practice and is now retired in Newport Beach, Calif.

- Maurice H. Stans, former commerce secretary and chief fund-raiser for Nixon's re-election committee who was fined $5,000 for non-willful receipt of illegal corporate contributions but was acquitted on more serious federal charges alleging conspiracy and collusions in the receipt of campaign funds. He has written a book and lives in Pasadena, Calif.

- Peter M. Flanigan, a presidential assistant for economic affairs. He is an investment banker with Dillon Reed & Co. in New York.

- James W. McCord, security chief for Nixon's re-election committee who served 69 days of a 1- to 5-year prison term for his role in the Watergate burglary. He lives in Colorado.

- Eugenio Martinez, anti-Castro activist who served 15 months of a 1- to 4-year sentence in the Watergate burglary. He is now a car sales manager at an auto dealership in Miami.

- Bernard L. Barker, anti-Castro activist who served 13 months of an 18-month to six-year sentence in the Watergate burglary. He recently retired from a municipal job in Miami.

- Virgilio Gonzalez, anti-Castro activist who served 13 months of a 1- to 4-year sentence in the Watergate burglary. He works as a locksmith in Miami.

- Frank Sturgis, anti-Castro activist who served 13 months of a 1- to 4-year sentenced in the Watergate burglary. He lives in Miami.

- Ben Bradlee, executive editor of the Washington Post who led the newspaper during its Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting on the Watergate break-in. He retired as editor in chief last year.

- Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the Washington Post reporters whose joint reporting based much on a confidential source nicknamed "Deep Throat" broke open the Watergate scandal and won the Pulitzer. Woodward is the Post's assistant managing editor for investigative reporting and has written several books. Bernstein left the Post to work for ABC News and Time magazine. He is now writing books.

- Archibald Cox, the original Watergate special prosecutor who was fired by Nixon in the famous "Saturday Night Massacre" after he refused to back down on subpoenas for White House tapes. He recently stepped down as chairman of the government watchdog Common Cause and from his position on the Harvard Law School faculty. He still teaches at Boston University.

- Leon Jaworski, the Houston lawyer who succeeded Cox as special prosecutor. He returned to his law practice in Texas and wrote two books. He died in 1982.

- Former Rep. Peter Rodino, D-N.J., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee that voted to recommend Nixon's impeachment. He is retired and living in New Jersey.

- Sen. Sam Ervin, D-N.C., chairman of the Senate Watergate Committee. After his retirement from the Senate, he lectured and practiced law in North Carolina. He died in 1985.

- U.S. District Judge John Sirica, who presided over the main Watergate cases. After retiring from the bench, he wrote a book entitled "To Set the Record Straight."