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ANDREWS AND `VICTOR/VICTORIA' SNUB TONYS

Julie Andrews and "Victor/Victoria," her big Broadway musical, have snubbed the 1996 Tony Awards show, refusing to appear on the national televised program honoring the best of the theater season.

Andrews, who rebuffed a best-actress nomination after her musical was shut out in every other category, won't appear live or on tape during the show, which CBS will broadcast June 2 from the Majestic Theater. Her name remains on the ballot."Julie has no plans to be there whatsoever," said Tony Adams, one of the producers of "Victor/Victoria."

And other Tony troubles piled up Tuesday as David Merrick, producer of "State Fair," filed a $2 million lawsuit to block voting in the category of best original score.

Merrick said the Tony nominating committee allowed only four of the musical's 15 songs by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II to be considered because the other numbers are from the 1945 and 1962 film versions of "State Fair" and from other Rodgers and Hammerstein shows.

In past years, film scores such as "Beauty and the Beast," "Gigi," "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" and "Meet Me in St. Louis" were nominated for Tonys.

Merrick said that if the vote proceeds based on an unfair restriction and "State Fair" loses, the loss of prestige and money will be irreversible.

While "Victor/Victoria" declined to participate in the entertainment segment of the show, several other productions that also did not receive best-musical nominations, such as "Big" and "State Fair," will be represented, said Gary Smith, executive producer of the TV show.

The Tonys offered "Victor/Vic-toria" one minute of air time as part of a medley - not enough time to "fairly reflect the values of our show," Adams said.

"There was no animosity," Adams said. "I understand their time problems. If we were offered four minutes, it was something we would have very seriously considered."

The two-hour broadcast will contain 1 hour, 31 minutes of entertainment, minus commercials, Smith said.