clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

People

FUTURE MAY NOT BE ROSY FOR JONES' PSYCHIC HOTLINE

Paula Jones has lent her name to a psychic hotline while she ponders a career as a country singer. She might want to stick to Patsy Cline.The woman whose lawsuit triggered events that nearly toppled a president isn't enticing many to fork out $3.49 a minute to dial their destiny.

"If this were a horse race, we'd be off to a slow start," said David Felger, president of the Zodiac Group Inc., the company in Boca Raton, Fla., that runs the Paula Jones Celebrity Psychic Network. He declined to say how much Jones is being paid.

WINFREY TAKING NEW ROLE AS A COLLEGE INSTRUCTOR

Actress. Talk show host. Bookseller. Empire builder. And now, professor.

Oprah Winfrey and longtime beau Stedman Graham will teach a course titled "Dynamics of Leadership" this fall at Northwestern University's J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management in Chicago.

"It has always been a dream of mine to teach," Winfrey, who didn't finish her bachelor's degree until 1987, said Wednesday. "We share the same beliefs in the importance of dynamic leadership in this country."

Graham, who has taught sports marketing at the school for two years, and Winfrey will instruct about 100 second-year business students for three hours once a week.

CLANCY AND HIS NEW FANCY PLAN A JUNE 26 WEDDING

The hunt for wedded bliss begins again for Tom Clancy.

The author of "Patriot Games" and other popular military spy novels has planned a June 26 wedding to longtime fiancee Alexandra Llewellyn, a freelance TV reporter.

The two plan to marry at St. Thomas Church in New York City, with a reception for 200 at the St. Regis Hotel. But the plan isn't set in stone, said Clancy's assistant, Elizabeth Patin. "Like anything, the venue probably will change," she said Wednesday.

NEW BRITISH POET LAUREATE GETS CONTRACT AND SALARY

Prime Minister Tony Blair appointed a new poet laureate on Wednesday, giving the nation's most exalted versifier a salary for the first time in more than 300 years but taking away his job security.

Andrew Motion, 46, a university professor known as much for his single venture in biography as for his seven volumes of poetry, was appointed to succeed Ted Hughes, who died in November.

"I think that I want to honor the traditional responsibilities, to write poems about royal occasions and so on, but I am also very keen to diversify the job, or at least make those poems part of the wider national issues that I also want to write about," Motion said.

His appointment is for 10 years at $8,000 a year. The poet laureate used to serve for life.