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What is Utah’s favorite rom-com?

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Across the country, “Pretty in Pink,” “Pretty Woman” and “About a Boy” top the list, according to a new survey from CableTV.com.

Across the country, “Pretty in Pink,” “Pretty Woman” and “About a Boy” top the list, according to a new survey from CableTV.com.

Courtesy CableTV.com

Most Utahns will probably watch “How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days” this Valentine’s Day.

That’s because it’s the most popular romantic comedy film in the Beehive State, according to a new survey from CableTV.com. Utah is the only state in the nation that ranks “How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days” — in which journalist Andie Anderson (Kate Hudson) tries to have a relationship with ad agency star Benjamin Barry (Matthew McConaughey) for less than 10 days — as a romantic comedy favorite.

Across the country, “Pretty in Pink,” “Pretty Woman” and “About a Boy” top the list.

To find these results, CableTV cross-referenced a list of romantic comedy films with Google Trends data of how popular these films were in each state.

Utah’s top choice fits in with its regional appetite for films with snark and sass, according to CableTV. Idaho favors “The Princess Bride” over all other rom-coms, while Wyoming enjoys “10 Things I Hate About You.”

Most states also prefer romantic comedies that take places in their hometown. For example, Alaskans liked “The Proposal,” which stars Ryan Reynolds and Sandra Bullock in a romantic adventure that takes place in Alaska, according to CableTV.com.

“As the winter of our discontent settles in, Americans turn to love to keep us warm. Viewers definitely have a thing for the quirky relationships that are standard romantic comedy fare, where happy endings come with a side of adorable,” according to CableTV.com.

You can see the entire map below.

Courtesy CableTV.com

“How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days” has a 42 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The film is rated PG-13 and includes some mature content, like drinking games and sexual humor.

According to Common Sense Media, the film’s roots in deception offer parents a valuable teaching lesson.

“Families can talk about how men and women may have different communication styles. And they should talk about bets that may hurt someone's feelings. What negative male and female stereotypes did you see here?”