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Picturing history: President Wilford Woodruff sites — conversion and early LDS Church membership

SHARE Picturing history: President Wilford Woodruff sites — conversion and early LDS Church membership

Wilford Woodruff joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (at that time called the Church of Christ) at Richland, New York, on Dec. 31, 1833.

In 1834, he marched with Joseph Smith and others in the Camp of Israel or Zion’s Camp. Wilford Woodruff, who later was the fourth president of the LDS Church, was among those who noted the discovery of the remains of a warrior given the name Zelph in Pike County, Illinois. The camp was formally discharged at the Michael Arthur farm near Liberty, Missouri, on July 3, 1834. President Woodruff stayed in the area for a while and worked for Arthur.

Wilford Woodruff's journal where he recorded his marriage to Phebe Carter.

Wilford Woodruff’s journal where he recorded his marriage to Phebe Carter.

Kenneth Mays

Following a mission to the Southern states, he met and married Phebe Carter. She later accompanied him on a mission to New England. She stayed with family while he served on the Fox Islands off of Maine. There he baptized over 100 people. A number of those converts joined him when he headed back to join the body of the Saints, most of whom had left Kirtland, Ohio, and their new temple.

By this time, Wilford Woodruff and three others had been called to serve in the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in a revelation now found in Doctrine and Covenants 118. He, his wife and new baby, and some of the converts from the Fox Islands wintered near Rochester, Illinois, about 8 miles from Springfield. Elder Woodruff was ordained to the apostleship at Far West, Missouri, in April 1839.

Correction: An earlier version of one of the photo captions identified a book as Wilford Woodruff's copy of the Book of Commandments. The book is his journal where he recorded his marriage to Phebe Carter.