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Did the 'Star Wars' franchise just get its own Kevin Feige?

Michelle Rejwan will be the 'Star Wars' version of Kevin Feige.

Michelle Rejwan will be the “Star Wars” version of Kevin Feige.
Michelle Rejwan will be the “Star Wars” version of Kevin Feige.
Screenshot, StarWars.com

SALT LAKE CITY — Michelle Rejwan will be the “Star Wars” version of Kevin Feige.

  • Lucasfilm announced on Monday that Michelle Rejwan will help the “Star Wars” franchise become like the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Rejwan will become the senior vice president of live action development and production at the stadium.
  • Rejwan, who previously worked on “The Rise of Skywalker” and “The Force Awakens,” will now oversee “all theatrical and direct-to-consumer live-action content.”
  • She will work with Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy to “shape and implement the creative strategy for Star Wars.”
  • “I’ve been incredibly impressed with her creative skills and her ability to manage the complexity surrounding these massive projects,” Kennedy said in Lucasfilm’s announcement.

Sound familiar?: It should. Rejwan will basically be the Lucasfilm version of Feige, who has overseen the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s creative strategy over the last few years, keeping the plot and storylines in order.

Next up: Rejwan will now have a pretty big task ahead with the “Star Wars” universe. Though Disney plans to take a break from “Star Wars” after “The Rise of Skywalker” drops, there will be another trilogy of films from the “Game of Thrones” showrunners and a number of Disney Plus projects, too.

Yes, but: Kennedy previously told Vanity Fair that she doesn’t know if the Marvel strategy will work for “Star Wars,” though. As I wrote, Kennedy said Lucasfilm and Disney could lose “Star Wars” fans if they become too much like the MCU.

  • “(I) think that Disney is very respectful of what this is, and right from the beginning we talked about the fragility of this form of storytelling. Because it’s something that means so much to fans that you can’t turn this into some kind of factory approach. You can’t even do what Marvel does, necessarily, where you pick characters and build new franchises around those characters. This needs to evolve differently.”