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Picturing history: President Gordon B. Hinckley sites — preserving historic sites in the U.S. & England

SHARE Picturing history: President Gordon B. Hinckley sites — preserving historic sites in the U.S. & England

Returning from his mission to England in 1935, young Elder Gordon B. Hinckley attended the dedication ceremony of the monument on top of Hill Cumorah in western New York.

Whether that experience affected him or not, there is no question that President Hinckley had a strong interest in sites associated with the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. For example, several temples announced and completed during his administration were located at historic sites. These include temples in Nauvoo, Illinois; Palmyra, New York; Preston, Lancashire, England; and Winter Quarters, Nebraska.

Cove Fort, Millard County, Utah. This historic structure was constructed by President Hinckley's grandfather.

Cove Fort, Millard County, Utah. This historic structure was constructed by President Hinckley’s grandfather.

Kenneth Mays

Moreover, President Hinckley authorized the raising of funds for a major restoration project at Kirtland, Ohio. This project included infrastructure, the restoration and refurbishing of extant structures, and the construction of new buildings with some of those structures being erected on their original sites. He dedicated the entire Kirtland Village complex in 2003.

Another meaningful site to him was Cove Fort, Millard County, which was constructed by his grandfather.

President Hinckley also had a powerful interest in the pioneer handcart sites in Wyoming. He authorized the purchase of the Sun Ranch near Martin’s Cove where thousands of visitors are hosted annually.

Because of his love for historic sites, it is fitting that a group of faithful church members in England raised money to acquire and restore the historic Gadfield Elm chapel and present the deed to President Hinckley in 2004.