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College admissions scandal: Why 14 former and current students filed a class-action lawsuit against universities

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of all of the denied students who paid application fees to the schools associated with the college admissions scandal.

Felicity Huffman, center, gets into a vehicle followed by her brother Moore Huffman Jr., outside federal, Monday, May 13, 2019, in Boston, where she pleaded guilty to charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Felicity Huffman, center, gets into a vehicle followed by her brother Moore Huffman Jr., outside federal court, Monday, May 13, 2019, in Boston, where she pleaded guilty to charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal.
Steven Senne

SALT LAKE CITY — The college admissions scandal took another turn on Monday as 14 former and current students who were denied admission into elite colleges associated with the scandal are now looking to sue the colleges and the mastermind behind the scandal, Rick Singer, according to USA Today.

  • The 14 former and current students filed a class-action complaint with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California on Friday.
  • The suit “builds on a similar class-action lawsuit brought by two students shortly after the Justice Department in March indicted 50 individuals, including parents and college coaches, in the sweeping ‘Varsity Blues’ scandal,” according to USA Today.
  • The lawsuit was filed on behalf of all the students who paid application fees to the schools associated with the college admissions scandal, including Stanford, the University of Southern California and the University of California, according to NBC Bay Area.
  • Similarly, 12 parents of denied students signed the lawsuit, which brings the total number of plaintiffs to 26.
  • The lawsuit says the schools were negligent and didn’t maintain "adequate protocols and security measures" to make sure the admissions process was fair.

Context: More than 50 parents were named and accused in the college admissions scandal earlier this year, including celebrities Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman. The parents were accused of working with school officials, coaches and faculty members to help their children get into universities through nefarious means such as bribery.