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Tropical Storm Humberto has become a hurricane. Should the U.S. worry?

The new tropical storm became a Category 1 hurricane Sunday. Will it hit the United States?

Rain drops cover a car’s window shield prior to the arrival of a new tropical depression, that turned into Tropical Storm Humberto, in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian en route to Mclean’s Town, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13, 2019. Humberto narr
Rain drops cover a car’s window shield prior to the arrival of a new tropical depression, that turned into Tropical Storm Humberto, in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian en route to Mclean’s Town, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13, 2019. Humberto narrowly missed the island over the weekend. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
AP

Tropical Storm Humberto has become a Category 1 hurricane.

The National Hurricane Center said Humberto will bring swells and heavy winds to the Bahamas and the southeastern U.S. for several days.

Humberto became a Category 1 hurricane with winds of 75 miles per hour. The storm happened 785 miles west of Bermudas, moving at 3 miles per hour, according to The Associated Press.

The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration said the hurricane has maximum winds of 85 miles per hour.

But the U.S. coast won’t have to worry about it. Rip currents may reach beachgoers on the southeastern U.S. coast, but the storm should avoid making landfall.

“This is expected to strengthen but the good news, my friends, is it’s going to remain offshore.” Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean said on “Fox & Friends.” “We’re going to see some indirect impacts like rip currents and certainly large waves and beach erosion.”

The Bahamas could see the brunt of the rainfall, though, which was already hit earlier this month by Hurricane Dorian, according to Fox News.

Swells and rip tides could be problematic, though, for anyone surfing or wading in currents.

The NOAA expects 10-17 storms this season. It’s believe five of them could strengthen into hurricanes. Only two to four of them are expected to be major hurricanes as Category 3, 4 and 5, according to Fox News.

The NOAA released names for these storms, which include: Andrea, Barry, Chantal, Dorian, Erin, Fernand, Gabrielle, Humberto, Imelda, Jerry, Karen, Lorenzo, Melissa, Nestor, Olga, Pablo, Rebekah, Sebastien, Tanya, Van and Wendy.