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Criminal defense lawyer says Lori Loughlin’s college admissions trial should last 3-4 days

It’ll be over in a week, he said.

SHARE Criminal defense lawyer says Lori Loughlin’s college admissions trial should last 3-4 days
Lori Loughlin, right, stars as Abigail Stanton in the Hallmark series “When Calls the Heart.”

Lori Loughlin, right, stars as Abigail Stanton in the Hallmark series “When Calls the Heart.”

Ricardo Hubbs

Lori Loughlin is still awaiting trial in the college admissions scandal, more than six months after she was first charged in the case.

The trial will likely begin sometime in 2020, assuming Loughlin doesn’t change her plea.

But the trial won’t last long, Utah criminal defense lawyer Greg Skordas told the Deseret News.

Skordas said the trial will last a week at the most. It might only last three to four days. At the most it would last a week, he said.

“This isn’t a difficult case for either side,” Skordas told the Deseret News. “The facts are fairly straightforward. It’s going to come down to what was in the mindset of the defendant. What was she doing? What was she thinking? What was she aware of? And why did she do it?”

Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli are accused of paying $500,000 in bribes so that their daughters, Olivia Jade and Isabella Rosa Giannulli, could be team crew recruits for the University of Southern California. The couple pleaded not guilty in the case. Even after federal prosecutors slapped a new round of charges on them earlier this week, the couple stood pat and kept their not guilty plea.

All signs indicate that Loughlin and Giannulli are headed for trial. Reports suggest that Loughlin truly believes she is innocent in the case and wants to battle it in court.

According to Skordas, there might be some legal reasoning for going to trial, too.

“The system would break down if we tried every case,” he said.

Skordas said lawyers will often recommend their clients set dates for trial so that federal prosecutors will “sweeten the pot a little bit” and make a better plea offer.

No one, he said, really wants to go to trial in these cases because it takes a lot of resources.

“Judges like to encourage resolution,” Skordas said. “You know, some people call it mediation but just sitting down trying to kind of hammer something out, plea bargaining, so that you’re not taking so many resources away.”

However, the trouble with trials is that they’re “all or nothing,” Skordas said.

“You either win or you lose,” he said. “If you plea bargain, you’re somewhere in the middle. You’re resolving the case in a way that sort of tries to make both sides happy, or maybe both sides a little bit unhappy, but at trial, there’s a winner and a loser.”

He added: “You know, trials are gut wrenching. I have clients who are pending trial and they’re just sick. You know, they can’t make plans. They can’t make vacation arrangements. You know, they’re just, they’re just, they’re just consumed with this trial is coming up and weeks or months and they don’t know what their life’s going to look like afterwards.”