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Ashley and Ethan Felix play outside with their children, from left, Briggs, 4; Andi Lou, 6; Beau, 8; and Wyatt, 12, at their home in Provo on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021.
Ashley and Ethan Felix play outside with their children, from left, Briggs, 4; Andi Lou, 6; Beau, 8; and Wyatt, 12, at their home in Provo on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. “The biggest factor predicting overall happiness is satisfaction with family life,” according to a New York Times essay co-authored by Deseret National executive editor Hal Boyd.
Spenser Heaps, Deseret News

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Deseret National editor discusses how to turn liberal frowns upside down in New York Times essay

When it comes to happiness, family and faith are important factors

In a New York Times guest essay published Thursday, Hal Boyd, the executive editor of Deseret National, joined with two scholars at the Institute for Family Studies, W. Bradford Wilcox and Wendy Wang, to explore why conservatives tend to report higher levels of life satisfaction than liberals, and how liberals can close the gap.

The authors pointed to research, including the Deseret News’ annual American Family Survey, to suggest that strong family relationships are a central factor.

“This gap is not explained by socioeconomic differences in income, race, age and gender between the two groups. But once we control for marriage, parenthood, family satisfaction, religious attendance and community satisfaction, the ideological gap in happiness disappears.

“On Thanksgiving, a holiday so many of us spend with our loved ones, we emphasize that of all these social factors, the biggest factor predicting overall happiness is satisfaction with family life.”

Read the full essay here.

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