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Subway is making some changes to its menu (and yes, it’s keeping the tuna)

Subway says it will make massive changes to its menu in the next few weeks

A woman wears a face mask near a Subway restaurant sign.
A woman wears a face mask to protect against the spread of the new coronavirus as she walks past a boarded-up storefront and a Subway restaurant sign, Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in Washington. Subway says it is making changes to its restaurant.
Patrick Semansky, Associated Press

Subway will be updating its menu across the country beginning next week.

Full list of Subway menu changes

Subway released an image of its full menu changes, which include changing the ingredients to its bread and bringing back sandwiches. Here’s a breakdown of the menu items that will change. It’s unclear what will change in all of the items below.

  • Italian bread
  • Multigrain bread
  • Smashed avocado
  • Fresh mozzarella
  • Parmesan vinaigrette
  • Bacon (it will now be hickory-smoked)
  • Black forest ham (it will be sliced thin)
  • Oven-roasted turkey (it will be sliced thin)
  • Steak (new seasoning)
  • Rotisserie-style chicken (seasoned with new Subway secret rub)
  • Roast beef (a new type of Angus beef will debut)

How to get a free Subway sandwich

Subway will be giving away 1 million free sandwiches from 10 a.m. to noon on July 13 as a part of the new promotion and changed menu.

The controversy of Subway menu

Subway has been making headlines because of its menu items — and not for good reasons. Back in October 2020, the Irish Supreme Court ruled that Subway’s rolls used for hot sandwiches should not be considered as actual bread items, BBC News reports.

  • The court said Subway’s bread has a high amount of sugar, which disqualifies the bread from being actual bread, as I wrote for the Deseret News.

A recent lawsuit from California residents Karen Dhanowa and Nilima Amin called Subway’s tuna into question. As the Deseret News reported, the two residents sued Subway for fraud, intentional misrepresentation and unjust enrichment after saying there’s no real tuna inside Subway’s tuna.

  • The New York Times and a lab collaborated on analysis to review the meat, too. The lab found that the meat had no real origin. “No amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample and so we obtained no amplification products from the DNA. Therefore, we cannot identify the species,” the results read, according to Complex.