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The Pac-12, Big Ten and ACC are reportedly wanting to build an ‘alliance.’ Could that mean anything for conference realignment?

Oregon safety Brady Breeze, left, runs for a touchdown past Wisconsin running back Garrett Groshek
Oregon safety Brady Breeze, left, runs for a touchdown past Wisconsin running back Garrett Groshek after a blocked punt during second half of the Rose Bowl NCAA college football game Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2020, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Things have been quiet on the collegiate athletics conference realignment front lately, but on Friday evening, The Athletic’s Max Olson reported that the Pac-12, Big Ten and ACC are in “high-level” discussions to form an alliance.

What would be the purpose of a Pac-12, Big Ten, ACC alliance?

Olson reported that an alliance would be more than just a scheduling partnership. Most notably, the thought is that the three conferences would form a bloc of sorts when it comes to major issues like College Football Playoff expansion.

According to Olson, “All three leagues and their relatively new commissioners are feeling some pressure to respond to the SEC’s aggression after the conference added Texas and Oklahoma as new members starting in 2025.”

How could a Pac-12, Big Ten, ACC alliance impact conference realignment?

That said, Olson reported that “None of the three have expressed serious interest in raiding what’s left of the Big 12, so working together is a logical next step and appears to be the likely outcome.”

Olson had reported earlier this month that Pac-12 commissioner George Kliavkoff and Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby were going to meet together to talk about working together, but Olson reported Friday that the Big 12 would likely not be included in the latest alliance talks.

What would a Pac-12, Big Ten, ACC alliance do?

Olson’s colleague Matt Fortuna wrote in the report that an alliance among the three conferences “would really show those three conferences’ power — 41 votes to the 16 votes of the expanded SEC.”

Olson quoted an athletic director who said, “This is their shot right back at the SEC.”