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What Nikki Haley said about a possible 2024 presidential run

The former U.N. ambassador and governor of South Carolina is seen as a possible GOP contender

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Former U.N. Ambassador and former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley speaks during an event.

Former U.N. Ambassador and former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley speaks during an event sponsored by Turning Point USA at Clemson University on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022, in Clemson, S.C. Haley is viewed as a possible Republican presidential candidate.

Meg Kinnard, Associated Press

Nikki Haley, the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President Donald Trump and former governor of South Carolina, said Tuesday she will use the Christmas holiday to evaluate whether she will run for president in 2024. If she decides to run, she will renege on her pledge last year to not run if Trump jumped into the race.

“We are taking the holidays to kind of look at what the situation is,” Haley said Tuesday at her alma mater Clemson University, according to CBSNews. “If we decide to get into it, we’ll put 1,000% in, and we’ll finish it.”

Haley served as governor of South Carolina from 2011 to 2017. Subsequently, Trump asked her to join his administration as ambassador to the U.N. Trump included Haley’s position in his cabinet, the first time in U.S. history. After serving for two years, she stepped down while reportedly still on good terms with the former president.

Her comments Tuesday echoed her words at the Republican Jewish Coalition in Las Vegas last week. She was one of a number of potential Republican presidential candidates to attend the meeting. “I’ve never lost an election, and I’m not going to start now,” Haley said according to media outlets.

Last year, Haley told The Associated Press she would not get in the way of another Trump run for president. “I would not run if President Trump ran, and I would talk to him about it,” Haley said in April of 2021.

Staffers of Haley’s political action committee, Stand with America, declined to comment to the media on what changed Haley’s mind or whether she had talked with Trump after he officially launched his campaign.

In Las Vegas last week, Haley pitched a more aggressive vision for the Republican Party, particularly in light of disappointing midterm results for the GOP. She advocated for the party to embrace the various forms of early voting allowed across the country.

“The Democrats did a full-court press to vote early — we sat on our hands,” Haley said. “Friends, early and absentee voting are here to stay. We need to play the same game and turn out the maximum number of voters. The left does it and we don’t.”