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What Ginni Thomas, wife of Clarence Thomas, said behind closed doors to the Jan. 6 committee

She addressed questions regarding her text messages and emails to Trump campaign officials trying to prove election fraud

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Virginia “Ginni” Thomas walks to a room at the O’Neill House Office Building.

Conservative activist Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, walks to a room at the O’Neill House Office Building, part of the Capitol complex, where she is being interviewed by the House panel investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection, in Washington on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022.

J. Scott Applewhite, Associated Press

Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, reiterated her belief that there was election fraud in the 2020 presidential election during her testimony in front of the House Select Committee investigating the Capitol riot on Jan. 6, 2021, according to Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Reports also say Thomas insisted she does not discuss her political activism with her husband, nor does he discuss his work on the Supreme Court with her. 

Thomas’ appearance was the result of an inquiry from the House panel into her communications with the Trump White House and the Trump campaign regarding their unsuccessful efforts to prove election fraud. 

She confirmed that she texted White House chief of staff Mark Meadows days after the November election urging former President Donald Trump to fight the election results.

“Help This Great President stand firm, Mark!!! ... You are the leader, with him, who is standing for America’s constitutional governance at the precipice. The majority knows Biden and the Left is attempting the greatest Heist of our History,” Ginni Thomas’ text message to Meadows reads on Nov. 10, 2021, according to The Washington Post

The text messages were obtained by the House panel through a government records review and Thomas alleges that members of the committee leaked them to the media. She said that her husband was not aware of the texts until they were published in the press.

“I know (Clarence) was completely unaware of my texts with Mark Meadows until this Committee leaked them to the press while he was in a hospital bed fighting an infection,” she said in an opening statement according to press reports.

Some political observers have accused her of improperly lobbying her husband on behalf of conservatives in controversial cases before the Supreme Court. Thomas said this wasn’t true and declared it “laughable” to suggest that she can influence her husband’s jurisprudence. “The man is independent and stubborn, with strong character traits of independence and integrity,” she said.

Thomas said that the Justice “never” speaks with her about pending cases at the Supreme Court. “It’s an iron clad rule in our home,” she said.

Thomas addressed her “volunteer campaign activities” pursuing evidence of election fraud. The committee obtained Thomas’ emails to state lawmakers in Arizona and Wisconsin after the 2020 election urging them to “fight back against fraud” and exercise their authority to choose a “clean” slate of presidential electors. 

Thomas did not have a formal role with the Trump campaign on legal challenges to the election results but she was reportedly in contact with John Eastman, Trump’s lawyer. 

Her support of the legal challenges have come under scrutiny given her husband’s role in deciding if the House select committee could gain access to the presidential diaries, White House visitor logs, speech drafts and other notes relating to the events of Jan. 6.

The Supreme Court ruled in favor of the House committee gaining access to these documents, with Justice Thomas as the lone dissenting vote

Ginni Thomas testified under oath and answered questions for a number of hours behind closed doors. Thompson told reporters that she answered “some questions” and that the panel would make public later any part of her testimony “if there’s something of merit.”

Thomas’ lawyer, Mark Paoletta, told the press that she “was happy to cooperate ... to clear up the misconceptions about her activities surrounding the 2020 elections.”

“And, as she told the committee, her minimal and mainstream activity focused on ensuring that reports of fraud and irregularities were investigated,” Paoletta continued. “Beyond that, she played no role in any events after the 2020 election results.”