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BYU became the first U.S university to offer Azerbaijani 101

Azerbaijan ambassador Khazar Ibrahim visited BYU to recognize the university for offering Azerbaijani as a study course

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Brigham Young University in Provo.

Brigham Young University in Provo on Wednesday Sept 21, 2022.

Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

Brigham Young University is now home to 132 foreign language courses (with 73 currently being offered), as the school became the first U.S. university to offer Azerbaijani 101.

Azerbaijan ambassador Khazar Ibrahim visited BYU to recognize the university for offering Azerbaijani, according to a university press release.

“There could be no better place than BYU to have the first Azerbaijani class,” Ibrahim said. “BYU’s programs are at the top of the list because of their depth — BYU teaches not only about the language, but about the culture too. The cultural nuance of a people is integral in understanding their language.”

The ambassador announced that Azerbaijan would offer a couple of scholarships for students to travel to Azerbaijan in connection with their studies.

“The current Azerbaijani 101 class of 11 students is taught by fellow BYU senior Andrew Bonney, who served his Latter-day Saint mission in Azerbaijan’s neighboring country Armenia,” per the press release.

This isn’t the first time that BYU was the first U.S. university to offer classes for a particular language. The Daily Universe reported that the school made history when it became the first U.S. university to offer Kirbati at the university level.

BYU’s foreign language programs have earned the school recognition from The Chronicle of Higher Education. According to the Daily Universe, BYU was ranked third in the U.S. for producing students with foreign language degrees.

Not only does BYU rank highly for foreign language programs, it also has the largest selection in the U.S. “We have more advanced language classes than any other university in the country,” Rebecca Brazzale, the assistant director of the BYU Center for Language Studies, told the Daily Universe.