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It’s an active one — Hawaii’s youngest volcano erupts again

Just a month after the largest active volcano quiets down, Kīlauea volcano glows red

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This webcam image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano, Jan. 5, 2023.

This webcam image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano, Thursday, Jan. 5, 2023. Kilauea began erupting inside its summit crater Thursday, the U.S. Geological Survey said, less than one month after the volcano and its larger neighbor Mauna Loa stopped releasing lava.

U.S. Geological Survey via Associated Press

On Thursday evening, Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano became active as it glowed red and began the eruption process, according to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Dane duPont, whose Twitter bio says “Hawaii Tracker,” shared this time-lapse video of the volcano’s caldera, filling with lava.

Kilauea has erupted dozens of times since the 1950s and dozens of times before that, per the Hawaii Center of Volcanology.

But perhaps the most recent and catastrophic was in 2018. When Kilauea erupted, it took an unexpected turn and wreaked havoc as it took out hundreds of residences, as reported by the Deseret News.

In a red alert issued by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on Thursday residents were warned that volcanic smog or “vog” from the volcano can be a health concern — it can be a lung irritant for people and animals and could damage crops downwind. However, the volcano is far enough from residences to not worry about lava flows like in the past.

Early lava fountains hit 50 meters high, throwing lightweight volcanic glass fragments into the air, which are also a concern as they can irritate the eyes and skin, per the alert.

The Kilauea volcano, located in Hawaii Volcanos National Park, is about 20.5 miles from — Mauna Loa — which recently stopped erupting a month ago, per The Associated Press. However, the observatory said, it still remains quiet and unaffected by Kilauea.