Wednesday night is a chance to see an astronomical phenomenon that won’t be seen again for 14 years: A “super blue moon.”

Unfortunately, the moon won’t actually appear blue, but the sight will still be worth a glance at the night sky, as it will be the “biggest and brightest moon of the year,” Space.com reports.

What is a super blue moon?

A super blue moon is a combination of a supermoon and a blue moon.

A supermoon happens when a full moon occurs at the same time that the moon reaches the point in its orbit closest to Earth. This makes the moon appear bigger than normal.

A blue moon, on the other hand, is the second full moon in a month. This occurs every two to three years, according to NASA.

How often do super blue moons occur?

A supermoon and a blue moon rarely overlap, making Wednesday night’s moon a rare sight.

Super blue moons occur on average every 10 years, according to NASA. The next super blue moon won’t happen again until January 2037.

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How to see the super blue moon

The super blue moon will be officially be visible starting Aug. 30 at 7:35 p.m. MDT, according to Space.com. That’s when the moon will turn to a full moon.