Generation Vexed

In Utah and across the nation, teens are struggling with record levels of anxiety. This year-long series by the Deseret News examines why teens are more anxious than ever and how families and communities can help.

Homepage and feed dek - Nec ullamcorper sit amet risus nullam eget felis eget nunc
Family, schools and community members all have a role to play in listening to, encouraging and strengthening teens with anxiety. Here is a toolkit to help you do just that.
Here are five things we learned about anxiety during our yearlong reporting journey.
Family, schools and community members all have a role to play in listening to, encouraging and strengthening teens with anxiety.
As part of a yearlong series on teens and anxiety, the Deseret News talked with mental health experts, former mission presidents, religious scholars and 20 returned missionaries who dealt with mental health challenges while serving.
There’s a “Help Wanted” sign hanging on the Ivory Tower as colleges nationwide struggle to keep up with an epidemic of mental health needs among students. The University of Michigan has a network that seems to be helping.
Parents and students can take action to make sure that mental health needs are met on campus. Here’s what to do.
While girls pedal harder, highly anxious boys may simply give up and shut down. But some of them say that mentors — sports figures and musicians and others who tell their own anxious tales — can make a big difference.
Boys may show anxiety in ways that confuse parents, seeming to be uncooperative or anxious, instead of stressed. Parents can do a lot to help their anxious boys.
A growing number of girls are developing anxiety disorders that experts believe are the result of constant and unhealthy societal expectations.
Every child is different, but here are some ideas from experts about the ways parents and caregivers can help their girls deal with overwhelming feelings of anxiety.
The Deseret News will host screenings of the IndieFlix film “Angst” in Salem, Sandy, Provo, Holladay and Vernal.
The FDA cautions that some drugs used to treat anxiety can cause suicidal thoughts and behaviors. But the risks of not treating anxiety in teens is equally serious, many doctors say.
Today’s youth feel pressure to pick the perfect college, the perfect career, the perfect spouse — all while having diminished faith in themselves, less life experience and poor coping skills.
During a panel discussion recently, audience members had lots of leftover questions about teens and anxiety, which we gathered and asked diverse experts nationwide to answer. Here are some of them.
In Utah and across the nation, teens are struggling with record levels of anxiety. This year-long series by The Deseret News examines why teens are more anxious than ever and how families and communities can help.
The Deseret News has collected questions about teen anxiety from the public and asked respected professionals to answer them. Here’s what they said.
Share your story about how you or a loved one struggles with anxiety, or share tips and strategies that are working for you.
You’re not alone. That was the idea behind Wednesday night’s free screening of “Angst: Raising Awareness Around Anxiety” at Fort Herriman Middle School, the second of two screenings sponsored this week by the Deseret News.
The event was organized by the Deseret News as part of six-month initiative of in-depth reporting, research, analysis and events to help Utahns address teen anxiety. A second screening of “Angst” will take place Wednesday in Herriman.
The Deseret News will host two film screenings and discussions on teen anxiety.
The Deseret News has launched an initiative to face the growing crisis of teen anxiety.