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The CDC predicts what will really happen next with COVID-19

CDC said there will be a change in COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths in the next month

Kaitlyn Le receives a rapid COVID-19 antigen test.
Kaitlyn Le receives a rapid COVID-19 antigen test at Rio Tinto Stadium in Sandy on Monday, Aug. 2, 2021. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention forecasted Wednesday that there will be a big drop in COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations in the next four weeks.
Scott G Winterton, Deseret News

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention forecasted Wednesday that there will be a big drop in COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations in the next four weeks.

Per CNN, the CDC forecast suggests there will be 740,000 to 762,000 total reported deaths in the U.S. from COVID-19 by Nov. 6. This would be a decline for the third straight week.

  • So far, there have been about 717,000 COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. right now.

Hospitalizations are expected to drop, too. The CDC predicted about 500 to 10,100 new confirmed COVID-19 hospitalization by Nov. 5, which will represent a decline for the fifth straight week, according to CNN.

In September, the University of Washington released a forecasting model that predicted another 100,000 people could die from the novel coronavirus by the end of 2021. When the model was released, 663,913 had died so far. This would suggest close to 764,000 people will die from COVID-19 by the end of the year.

A model from the University of Washington was a little more conservative compared to the CDC prediction, putting COVID-19 deaths close to 762,000 by the beginning of November.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on the “Today” show at the time of the University of Washington’s prediction that vaccines can bring about the end of COVID-19.

  • “If we do it right and get through the winter, I hope as we get to the spring of 2022, we’ll get there,” he said.

Similarly, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the director for the CDC, said the U.S. will avoid another COVID-19 surge if vaccination rates climb.

  • “I think now is our moment to really double down on our vaccination efforts and our other prevention interventions,” she said on “Good Morning America.”