Facebook Twitter

Do people want the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine?

A new report suggests people want the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine for a number of reasons

SHARE Do people want the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine?
Boxes stand next vials of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in the pharmacy of National Jewish Hospital fin Denver.

In this March 6, 2021, file photo, boxes stand next vials of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in the pharmacy of National Jewish Hospital for distribution in east Denver.

David Zalubowski, Associated Press

It appears the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine has a pretty big following.

Do people want the J&J COVID-19 vaccine?

Despite some of the controversies and cultural perceptions, people across the United States are requesting the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine instead of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

According to The Washington Post, a vaccination site at Indiana University Health saw people request the J&J vaccine over the Pfizer vaccine. In fact, a spokesman told The Washington Post that 1,355 people asked for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine compared to the 407 people who wanted the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

Margot Kushel, director of the University of California San Francisco Benioff Homelessness and Housing Initiative, told The Washington Post that homeless people have been seeking the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, too.

“For most people experiencing homelessness, it was their preference,” she said. “They wanted it to be one and done. They didn’t want to worry about coming back.”

  • Of course, a poll from The Washington Post and ABC News found less than 25% of unvaccinated Americans would want to get the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. However, that poll was conducted during the recent Johnson & Johnson vaccine pause.

Johnson & Johnson vaccine pause

In April, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Food and Drug Administration paused the rollout of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine’s after reports of blood clots among women, as I wrote for the Deseret News.

However, the CDC and FDA later resumed distribution and ended the pause, deciding to add a warning label to the vaccine, according to the FDA.

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the CDC director, said the pause was done for safety reasons, according to my report for the Deseret News.

  • “As we always do, we will continue to watch all signals closely as more Americans are vaccinated. I continue to be encouraged by the growing body of real-world evidence that the authorized COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective, and they protect people from disease, hospitalization and death. I urge anyone with questions about the COVID-19 vaccines to speak with their health care provider or local public health department.”