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The danger of the delta variant you haven’t thought of yet

Experts continue to warn that the delta variant could create problems for many

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Medics wearing special suits to protect against coronavirus transfer a patient.

Medics wearing special suits to protect against coronavirus transfer a patient with coronavirus at the City hospital No. 52 for coronavirus patients in Moscow on Thursday, June 17, 2021.

Denis Grishkin, Moscow News Agency photo via AP

Experts continue to express concern about the delta variant of the novel coronavirus, which has been rapidly spreading in the United States as of late.

Much of the concern has been centered around the unvaccinated, who have less protection against the delta variant, which has a higher transmission rate, as I wrote for the Deseret News.

But Vivek Cherian, an internal medicine physician in Baltimore, told Insider that the delta variant could be even more troublesome because, well, it could create more variants.

  • “The worst-case scenario is if delta mutates into something completely different, a completely different animal, and then our current vaccines are even less effective or ineffective,” Cherian told Insider.

This essentially means that the delta variant may create even more dangerous variants for the vaccinated and unvaccinated.

Time to stop those COVID-19 variants might be running out, Dr. Paul Offit told CNN.

  • “Vaccines are our only way out of this,” Offit told CNN. “Unless we vaccinate a significant percentage of the population before winter hits, you’re going to see more spread and the creation of more variants, which will only make this task more difficult.”

Offit — who is on the Food and Drug Administration Vaccines Advisory Committee — told CNN that getting people vaccinated remains the biggest challenge.

  • “You would have thought at the beginning of this, knowing that vaccines are our only way out of the pandemic, the hardest part would have been figuring out how to construct these vaccines,” said Offit, according to CNN. “The hardest part is convincing people to get it, which is remarkable.”