clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

This doctor says there’s ‘a surge of fear’ making people afraid of the COVID-19 vaccine

A Kentucky doctor said people are afraid of the COVID-19 vaccine even if it can save your life

Registered nurse Jack Kingsley attends to a COVID-19 patient at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center in Boise, Idaho.
Registered nurse Jack Kingsley attends to a COVID-19 patient in the medical intensive care unit at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. People are scared of the COVID-19 vaccine, even though it can save their lives, according to Dr. William Melah, the chief medical officer for St. Claire Health Care.
Kyle Green, Associated Press

People are scared of the COVID-19 vaccine, even though it can save their lives, according to Dr. William Melah, the chief medical officer for St. Claire Health Care in Morehead, Kentucky.

Why are people scared of the COVID-19 vaccine?

Melah told CNN that there’s a lot of panic from people about getting the vaccine, even though it’s been proven to limit infection and hold off severe illness and hospitalization.

  • “I think this is a surge of fear now and these people are afraid of a vaccine that could save their lives — and that’s why they’re in the hospital now,” he told CNN.
  • Melah said 85% to 88% of his patients are unvaccinated. But the surge has impacted everyone, regardless of vaccination status.
  • In fact, the surge in hospitalizations has made it so regular patients can’t get emergency care. Some people have had to wait 24 hours “until someone gets better or dies,” according to CNN.

Idaho’s COVID hospitalizations rise

We’re seeing this play out in Idaho, too. Idaho recently enacted a “crisis standards of care” to help overwhelmed hospitals that are facing a surge of COVID-19 patients.

Currently, residents may not get the care they need or normally expect because COVID-19 patients are filling up their hospitals beds, according to The Associated Press.

The crisis standard of care will allow hospitals to use resources for patients who are more likely to survive, as I wrote for the Deseret News. All patients will still receive care but they could be sent to “hospital classrooms or conference rooms rather than traditional hospital rooms or go without some lifesaving medical equipment,” according to The Associated Press.