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A doctor shares the COVID-19 symptom you won’t often find with the omicron variant

The omicron variant creates mild symptoms. But is there anything else to know?

A line of cars stretching several blocks wait to pull into an appointment-only COVID-19 testing center in Seattle.
A line of cars stretching several blocks wait to pull into an appointment-only COVID-19 testing center on Thursday, Jan. 6, 2022, in Seattle. We’re still learning about the omicron variant of the coronavirus and the COVID-19 symptoms associated with it. With that, there are multiple questions about which symptoms you won’t see with the variant.
Elaine Thompson, Associated Press

We’re still learning about the omicron variant of the coronavirus and the COVID-19 symptoms associated with it. With that, there are multiple questions about which symptoms you won’t see with the variant.

Dr. John Vanchiere, the associate director of the Center for Emerging Viral Threats at Louisiana State University Health Shreveport, told NPR that omicron variant cases appear to be more mild compared to previous COVID-19 variants and strains.

  • In all, omicron variant symptoms appear similar to other upper respiratory infections, Vanchiere said.
  • Experts have said the omicron variant is similar to common colds for fully vaccinated and boosted individuals. Of course, this isn’t the case with everyone infected.

Vanchiere said you don’t often find a cough or fever with the omicron variant compared to previous variants.

  • “It’s mostly that runny nose, sore throat and nasal congestion,” Vanchiere said. “The cough is milder (than previous variants), if there’s any cough at all, and fever seems to be a little less common.”

Experts have been consistent with their messaging that the omicron variant is similar to the common cold.

  • Per Reuters, this is likely happening because the omicron variant probably acquired a mutation from a snippet of genetic material found in the common cold.
  • There has been concern about “flurona” cases popping up, too, as I wrote for the Deseret News. Flurona is a mix of the flu and coronavirus, which is a combination that was originally seen in the early days of the pandemic.

Dr. Lisa Barrett, an infectious disease specialist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, told Yahoo! News that getting a COVID-19 test can help you determine if you’re infected with the common cold or COVID-19.