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This movie theater chain bluntly explains why kids won’t like ‘Joker’

Alamo Drafthouse Cinema explains why children won’t like the new film

Joaquin Phoenix as Arthur Fleck in Warner Bros. Pictures, Village Roadshow Pictures and BRON Creative’s “Joker,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
Joaquin Phoenix as Arthur Fleck in Warner Bros. Pictures, Village Roadshow Pictures and BRON Creative’s “Joker,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
Niko Tavernise, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

A movie theater chain has expressed concern to parents who are considering bringing their children to see the new “Joker” film.

Alamo Drafthouse Cinema published a warning to parents in a Facebook post Wednesday, which was later confirmed by a representative of the theater, according to Entertainment Weekly.

Here’s the full warning:

“Parental warning (this is not a joke). ‘Joker is Rated R and for good reason. There’s lots of very, very rough language, brutal violence, and overall bad vibes.

“It’s a gritty, dark, and realistic ‘Taxi Driver’-esque depiction of one man’s descent into madness. It’s not for kids, and they won’t like it, anyway.

“There’s no Batman.”

The Facebook post showing the warning was later deleted.

“Joker” is rated R for strong bloody violence, disturbing behavior, language and brief sexual images.

Some critics were concerned that the R-rating could hurt the film’s total earning potential. Right now, “Joker” has the potential to break October records with a $90 million opening weekend, which would surpass “Venom” ($80.2 million), according to the Deseret News. However, “Venom” had a PG-13 rating, giving it more opportunities for success.

“Joker” has received heavy criticism for the violence it portrays, particularly in glorifying a man’s descent into a violent villain. Experts told this reporter that the film could ignite real-world violence, too.

“Once you start getting into the head of, you know, the sociopath, the anti-social person, the revolutionary, that’s when we suddenly think that this image of violence can be inspiring to the wrong kind of people,” said Kendall Phillips, a pop culture professor at Syracuse University.