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Lori Loughlin trial date officially set for her college bribery charges

Here’s when Lori Loughlin trial begins

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In this Aug. 27, 2019 file photo, actress Lori Loughlin departs federal court in Boston after a hearing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal.

In this Aug. 27, 2019 file photo, actress Lori Loughlin departs federal court in Boston after a hearing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal.

Steven Senne, Associated Press

Lori Loughlin will head to trial on Oct. 5, 2020,  U.S. District Judge Nathaniel Gorton said Thursday.

What’s going on?

  • Lori Loughlin and her defense team had a status conference Thursday at a Boston federal courthouse.
  •  U.S. District Judge Nathaniel Gorton said Thursday that the trial would happen on Oct. 5, 2020, at the Boston Federal court.
  • Loughlin and her husband will be among the first group of parents tried in the college admissions scandal.
  • A second group of defendants will face trial on Jan. 11, 2021.
  • Loughlin will have another status conference before a judge on July 28, 2020.
  • Jury selection will be in late September, according to Deadline.
  • Judge Gorton said the trial “will be completed well before Thanksgiving,” according to Deadline.
  • The couple could face up to 50 years in prison.

Some more context:

Loughlin and her defense team tried to move the trial date back, which I wrote about for the Deseret News. Loughlin’s defense team said that she should be exonerated based on new FBI evidence, which included interview notes from scandal mastermind William “Rick” Singer.

  • According to CNN, the defense attorney’s wrote: “The government is trying to benefit from withholding information in violation of its obligations and the defendants constitutional rights, but then force trial as quickly as it can. The government should not be rewarded, nor the defendants punished, for this kind of egregious lack of candor and violation of its obligations.”
  • But the defense argued this wasn’t the case.