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How to make the latest internet craze: whipped everything

From coffee to milk and even to Nutella, whipped drinks are all the rage right now

This May 30, 2012 image shows a dessert of spiced and grilled angel food cake with strawberries and whipped cream in Concord, N.H. Now people are whipping more than just cream, they’re whipping all their favorite drinks.
This May 30, 2012 image shows a dessert of spiced and grilled angel food cake with strawberries and whipped cream in Concord, N.H. Now people are whipping more than just cream — they’re whipping all their favorite drinks.
Associated Press

We all know and love whipped cream. It’s a delicious topper for drinks, pies, ice cream sundaes and more delicious desserts — or even just by itself, right into your mouth. But now the old classic has some competition, as people across the internet have started to wonder, instead of putting whipped cream on your drink, why not just whip your entire drink?

It started with the frothy whipped “Dalgona coffee,” which Time reports originated in South Korea before taking YouTube and TikTok by storm thanks to its extremely aesthetically pleasing two-tone look, milk on the bottom, ice and then the whipped coffee mixture on top.

Now, it seems people are making coffee-free alternatives out of anything delicious and sweet they can find.

For non-coffee lovers, Yahoo! News found this video tutorial for a whipped Nutella milk drink on Instagram.

Insider reports that the very same Florida influencer, Valentina Mussi, also shared short video tutorials for cocoa- and strawberry-flavored dalgona drinks, placing measurements and instructions for the recipes in the captions of her videos.

Fox News reports that Mussi’s whipped strawberry milk recipe quickly went viral. In just five days the post has received nearly 450,000 likes.

In reality, it seems the dalgona trend has awakened influencers and eaters alike to a revolutionary (and delicious) concept: almost anything can be whipped into a frothy treat.