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Why is everyone on Twitter talking about cake? Here’s our explainer

Is it cake? Maybe!

A baker forms round marble cakes wrapped in fondant that look like toilet paper rolls, as a funny comment to the toilet paper frenzy due to the coronavirus outbreak, in Dortmund, Germany, Thursday, March 26, 2020. The special cake became a local bestseller at the bakery. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
A baker forms round marble cakes wrapped in fondant that look like toilet paper rolls, as a funny comment to the toilet paper frenzy due to the coronavirus outbreak, in Dortmund, Germany, Thursday, March 26, 2020. The special cake became a local bestseller at the bakery.
Martin Meissner, Associated Press

Social media added a new trend over the last week focused on ... cakes.

Anyone searching Twitter will see tweets about cakes. People will ask, “Is it cake?” Or make references to the delicious dessert in some fashion.

The meme came about after multiple videos showed ordinary items cut in half, revealing an inside full of cake.

BuzzFeed’s Tasty account posted a compilation of clips, showing toilet paper, Crocs and plants all revealed to be cake.

Natalie Sideserf, owner of Sideserf Cake Studio in Austin, Texas, told The New York Times she saw several of her cakes in many of the shared clips.

She’s been baking hyper-realistic cakes for years. “I’ve always called them ‘still life cakes,’” she told The New York Times. “They’re like a still life painting. I try to make them as realistic as possible.” She said she has seen an uptick in orders and just got a request for a hyper-realistic shoe cake this week.

Don Caldwell, the editor of Know Your Meme, told The New York Times that people enjoy these memes because it asks a question and doesn’t necessarily take a political stance.

“People see the memes and want to know where the joke came from,” Caldwell said. So “then they’ll watch the video too.”