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Olivia Jade, Isabella Rose Giannulli were involved in the college scandal, U.S. attorney says

Lori Loughlin’s daughters were involved in the college admissions scandal.

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Lori Loughlin, center, and her daughters Olivia Jade Giannulli and Isabella Rose Giannulli attend the premiere of “Fuller House” on Feb. 16, 2016, in Los Angeles.

Lori Loughlin, center, and her daughters Olivia Jade Giannulli and Isabella Rose Giannulli attend the premiere of “Fuller House” on Feb. 16, 2016, in Los Angeles.

Jordan Strauss, Invision via Associated Press

Lori Loughlin’s daughters — Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose Giannulli — may have been involved in the college admissions scandal after all.

What’s happening:

Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are facing charges in the college admissions scandal and will be sentenced on Friday, Aug. 21.

  • The couple pleaded guilty to paying $500,000 in bribes so that their daughters could be team crew recruits for the University of Southern California. The couple originally pleaded not guilty before swapping their plea.
  • For months, it was unclear what role Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose played in the scandal. Some suggested Olivia Jade might have to testify against her mother.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Justin O’Connell wrote in a memo to the judge on Monday, August 17, that the daughters did have a role in the scandal, US Weekly magazine reports.

The crime Giannulli and Loughlin committed was serious. Over the course of two years, they engaged twice in Singer’s fraudulent scheme. They involved both their daughters in the fraud, directing them to pose in staged photographs for use in fake athletic profiles and instructing one daughter how to conceal the scheme from her high school counselor.

The memo said Loughlin and Giannulli instructed Olivia Jade how to speak with an adviser.

Olivia Jade allegedly asked her parents if she should add USC as her school of choice.

  • Loughlin said: ”Yes … But it might be a flag for the weasel to meddle.”
  • Giannulli said: “Don’t say too much to that man.”

What’s next:

Loughlin and Giannulli are set to face a virtual sentencing on Friday, which is about three months after they entered their guilty pleas.

Loughlin agreed to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud, and Giannulli will plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud and honest services wire and mail fraud, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts.

  • Loughlin agreed to be sentenced to two months in prison, a $150,000 fine and two years of supervised release with 100 hours of community service, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts.
  • Giannulli agreed to be sentenced to five months in prison, a $250,000 fine and two years supervised release with 250 hours of community service, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts.