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How Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s entire family got the coronavirus

Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson explained how his family became infected with COVID-19

In this Wednesday, April 3, 2019, file photo, Dwayne Johnson speaks during the Universal Pictures presentation at CinemaCon 2019, the official convention of the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) at Caesars Palace, in Las Vegas. Johnson says he and his family tested positive for the coronavirus. Johnson announced their diagnosis in an 11-plus minute video on Instagram on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020.
In this Wednesday, April 3, 2019, file photo, Dwayne Johnson speaks during the Universal Pictures presentation at CinemaCon 2019, the official convention of the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) at Caesars Palace, in Las Vegas. Johnson says he and his family tested positive for the coronavirus. Johnson announced their diagnosis in an 11-plus minute video on Instagram on Wednesday, Sept. 2.
Chris Pizzello, Invision via Associated Press

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson recently announced that he and his family got the novel coronavirus. How did it happen?

What’s going on:

Johnson said in an Instagram video Wednesday night that he, his wife and two daughters all caught the novel coronavirus despite staying disciplined.

  • “We have been disciplined, we’ve isolated, we’ve quarantined, I have not worked — and we’ve done a pretty good job.”

But the family contracted the virus from some family friends, who didn’t know they were carrying the virus.

  • “We picked up COVID-19 off some very close friends,” he said. “And these are people who we love and trust, these are people who we still love and trust and they are devastated that it led to them infecting our family.”

He highlighted a lesson — anyone can have the novel coronavirus, including family and friends.

  • “But like a lot of you guys out there, having your friends over, your family members and loved ones, of course, you want that, to be with the people who you love.”

Small gatherings and COVID-19

Experts have recently expressed worry about people having small gatherings, especially as Labor Day weekend arrives, according to USA Today. Experts said people want small gatherings because they don’t think they’ll get infected. But this can lead to larger spreads.

  • “People don’t think of it in the same way as the (President) Trump rally in Tulsa, a bunch of people on the beach or in the bars, but these small events add up to a lot. It’s just invisible,” Dr. Peter Chin-Hong, a professor of medicine at the University of California-San Francisco, told USA Today.