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Johns Hopkins reveals how to stop the omicron variant in new ‘Home Alone’ video

Johns Hopkins released a holiday-themed video about stopping the coronavirus

Shixian Wang, a pharmacist with Red Rock Pharmacy, fills a syringe with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.
Shixian Wang, a pharmacist with Red Rock Pharmacy, fills a syringe with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at The Ridge Foothill senior living facility in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has released a new video that shows a simple way to tackle the omicron variant.

The video uses a scene from “Home Alone” to show the strength of vaccines and boosters. It begins with Kevin McCallister’s paint can — labeled “vaccine” — hitting and knocking down Marv, who is identified as the delta variant. Harry, who is marked as omicron, evades the can (like the omicron variant evades vaccines).

However, Kevin’s second can — labeled booster — comes down and smacks Harry right in the face, knocking down the omicron variant.

“Reminder: Being vaccinated and boosted is your best line of defense against severe illness from COVID-19,” according to Johns Hopkins.

That said, some early research suggests that the omicron variant is resistant to the COVID-19 vaccine, antibody treatments and COVID-19 booster shots, as I wrote for the Deseret News. That means that fully vaccinated people should still consider the omicron variant when engaging with the public.

  • “There is now consistent evidence that Omicron is spreading significantly faster than the Delta variant,” WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Monday, per Reuters.
  • “And it is more likely people vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19 could be infected or re-infected,” Tedros said.

Experts recommend unvaccinated people receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Those who are fully vaccinated should consider the COVID-19 booster shot to stay protected, too.