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Letters: Save the postal service — the 2020 election is on the line

Readers also weigh in on NBA players kneeling during the national anthem and the overlooked heroes of the COVID-19 pandemic.

SHARE Letters: Save the postal service — the 2020 election is on the line
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In this Wednesday, May 6, 2020, photo, United States Postal Service carrier Henrietta Dixon gets into her truck to deliver mail in Philadelphia.

Associated Press

Since President Donald Trump appointed Louis DeJoy as the new U.S. postmaster general in May, DeJoy has made efforts to slow down and cripple mail service. I have seen this personally with our mail being delivered as late as 8 p.m. on some days and not at all on other days.

Republicans are in serious danger of sparking voter outrage nationally by allowing Trump to sabotage the U.S. Postal Service in order to seed chaos and doubt into the national election. The overall threat this poses to our national election in November is frightening. Trump is trying to delegitimize the national election by claiming late-counted mail-in votes are fraudulent, while at the same time having his appointed postmaster gum up the mail delivery system to make it impossible to vote by mail on a timely basis.

Republican congressmen and senators need to pressure Trump to change this and make the Postal Service functional on a day-to-day basis again. Otherwise, they may see the example of Wisconsin play out nationally. After the Wisconsin Supreme Court recently ruled that a state election had to be held in spite of the danger to voters coming to the polls during a pandemic, voter outrage triggered an upset win for the Democrat running for the Wisconsin State Supreme Court.

If Republican legislators fail to act, they need to understand that they will be held accountable in the November election, and the anticipated blue wave may become a tidal wave, sweeping out all traces of their power.

Michael Budig

Salt Lake City


Kneeling during the anthem is a constitutional right

It seems as though the national anthem and the flag represent something different to Ralph Boren than they do to me (Letter: Could NBA players and coaches not find another way to peacefully protest? August 4). To me and others, they are symbols of the hard-fought freedom that so many Americans enjoy.  

Tragically, however, these freedoms are not enjoyed by all. For example, Black men are not free to go for a jog without fear of being chased down and killed. Black men and women are not free to shop without harassment. Black parents are not free to send their children out into the world without constant worry about their safety or survival.

Our country has a long history of protests bringing about necessary change, like the end of slavery, allowing women to vote, and the end of Jim Crow laws. The First Amendment to the United States Constitution protects every person’s right to free speech. If you are offended by the current protest movement or any protest movement, please take a serious look at what freedoms you enjoy that others cannot. Taking a knee is, in fact, respecting the Constitution, the First Amendment and everyone’s right to free speech.

In the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., “No one is free until we are all free.”

William Richter

Millcreek


Let’s hear about the groups that keep our economy going

For the past four months, all we’ve heard about from the news media is the virus, riots and all the restaurants that are closed down, and all their negative effects. Instead, let’s hear about all those that are keeping the economy going and who will be our hope for the future. They are the ones paying the taxes that have made it possible for stimulus packages and help for the real needy. 

Where I live, one example I see is people building homes for families. They are men and women of all ethnicities. They work long hours through the heat of summer and the cold of winter. Without them, we would all be homeless. This is only one group that keeps our economy going. Let’s hear about them in the news, as well as other groups that supply our basic needs of food, clothes, shelter and essential supplies. They are also our heroes.

Greg DeHaan

Herriman