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Southwest Airlines shares corny joke about the Utah monolith

Southwest Airlines said it knows the location of the Utah monolith.

A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-7H4 takes off, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020, from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-7H4 takes off, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020, from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Wilfredo Lee, Associated Press

Southwest Airlines recently said it knows the location of the missing Utah monolith — with a corny joke.

What happened:

Southwest Airlines shared a tweet that joked about the mysterious Utah monolith, which was spotted in Utah about a week ago before it disappeared.

  • The airline tweeted a photo of the monolith with numbers photoshopped onto it, suggesting the monolith is a sign at an airport gate.
  • The airline said: “Sorry y’all, we needed it back.”

The search is on for the monolith

People across the world are wondering what happened to the mysterious monolith, which was likely an art project rather than an alien object. The New York Times reports the Utah monolith was dismantled by four men.

Ripley’s Believe It or Not! has offered a $10,000 reward if you know anything about the monolith, as I wrote about for the Deseret News.

  • “In a year full of chaos, the sudden appearance and disappearance of the monolith has proved quite a distraction amidst the 2020 news cycle. Naturally, as curators of the odd, unusual and unknown, we’re on the hunt for the missing extraterrestrial artwork. Who placed this shining beacon in the Utah desert? Who took it away? Where is it now?”

A separate monolith was recently discovered in Romania, too. It’s a little different than the Utah one, and appears to be a copy cat more than anything, which I wrote about for the Deseret News.