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How rainbows are helping people across the world get through social distancing

People in Italy, Canada and even the UK have begun participating in something called ‘The rainbow campaign’

A rainbow rises on May 10 near the Cathedral of the Madeleine, with the east bench of Salt Lake City in the background.
A rainbow rises on May 10 near the Cathedral of the Madeleine, with the east bench of Salt Lake City in the background.
August Miller, Deseret News

The rainbow campaign, a movement believed to have started in Italy, is spreading across the world in an attempt to bring hope to people struggling with social distancing, or who are otherwise affected by the devastating COVID-19 pandemic, CTV reports.

The campaign is simple, people are putting rainbows out for everyone to see. In Montreal, Canada the art is often accompanied by the French phrase “Ca va bien aller” which translates to “It’s going to be okay.”

The campaign is another way, much like the earlier call in the United States for people to put their Christmas lights back up, for people to spread positivity in an uncertain and difficult time.

Kids are joining in on the fun as they’re staying home from school, sharing their own rainbows.

BBC reports the movement has also become popular in the United Kingdom, with many parents encouraging their children to create rainbow art with them, providing them an uplifting activity together in uncertain times, and a way to communicate hope to their friends and neighbors from a distance.

Local businesses are also participating, like this professional balloon artist.

Even the Montreal Airport changed its facade to reflect the rainbow movement.