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Tesla updated its autopilot feature. Here’s why drivers aren’t happy about it

Some Tesla drivers got a ‘traffic light and stop sign control’ update last week. It doesn’t work very well.

Sonja Koch, Tesla communications spokeswoman, shows some of the features in a Tesla Model S P90D outside the Tesla showroom in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016.
Sonja Koch, Tesla communications spokeswoman, shows some of the features in a Tesla Model S P90D outside the Tesla showroom in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016. Tesla recently updated its autopilot feature with “traffic light and stop sign control.”
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Newer Tesla vehicles recently received an autopilot update allowing them to recognize and respond to stop signs and traffic lights, TechCrunch reports.

But it may be too good to be true.

According to the Verge, when activated, the new autopilot feature — called “traffic light and stop sign control” — will automatically slow the car down at all traffic lights until a driver overrides it by pressing on the gas or pulling down on the Autopilot stalk. The new feature also does not recognize railroad crossings or crosswalks.

Some customers are upset their cars are stopping and slowing when they shouldn’t — and not stopping when they should under the new update, according to CNN,

The new update is part of a pledge the company’s CEO, Elon Musk, made to convert the vehicles from cruise control and auto-steer to fully self-driving by the end of this year, Fox News reported.

The new software is labeled as “beta” and still has a few kinks to work out, according to Forbes. One user complained that under the new update, the car approached a stop sign at full speed and stopped abruptly at the last second. The same user also said the update capped the vehicle’s speed limit and made it difficult to get past an intersection with a flashing red light.

Tesla has said the software should improve gradually over time with use, as the system adapts, ABC reports. But according to Forbes, there’s a bigger issue at play here: Autopilot softwares still in testing mode should not be tested on the consumer.

“Any manufacturer of any product that pushes out a safety critical feature that is not fully developed, tested and validated is guilty of negligence,” Forbes reported.