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These videos show the huge damage created by locusts in Africa

BBC News and Washington Post share videos of waves of locusts attacking Africa

SHARE These videos show the huge damage created by locusts in Africa
FILE - In this Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020 file photo, ranger Gabriel Lesoipa is surrounded by desert locusts as he and a ground team relay the coordinates of the swarm to a plane spraying pesticides, in Nasuulu Conservancy, northern Kenya. A supercomputer is boosting efforts in East Africa to control a locust outbreak that raises what the U.N. food agency calls “an unprecedented threat” to the region’s food security. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

Ranger Gabriel Lesoipa is surrounded by desert locusts as he and a ground team relay the coordinates of the swarm to a plane spraying pesticides, in Nasuulu Conservancy, northern Kenya, on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020.

Ben Curtis, Associated Press

A second wave of locusts has started to cause destruction across East Africa, months after the area was plagued with another invasion.

What’s going on:

BBC News shared a new video that depicts that harrowing damage of the locusts in Africa. David Hughes from the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization told BBC News that the damage could have huge implications.

Watch the video below or at BBC News.


Similarly, The Washington Post shared photos and videos of trillions of locusts descending on East Africa as the second wave begins.

Governments and the United Nations’ agencies told The Washington Post that the locusts will create massive food shortages since the locusts will eat cropland.

Watch the package at The Washington Post.

More on the second wave

According to reports, the second wave has begun swarming Africa. And it could threaten the food supply. But, according to the The New Humanitarian, the coronavirus pandemic could impact relief efforts.

The New Humanitarian said: “While farmers had already harvested most of their crops by the time the first generation emerged, the latest swarms are coming at the start of the planting cycle, and as new seedlings — which locusts prefer over mature crops — begin to sprout.”