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Can you get coronavirus twice? Experts say it’s definitely possible

Getting COVID-19 is definitely possible, experts told USA Today

In this July 6, 2020, file photo, a ventilator helps a COVID-19 patient breath inside the Coronavirus Unit in a Houston hospital. Hospital data related to the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S. will now be collected by a private technology firm, rather than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — a move the Trump administration says will speed up reporting but one that concerns some public health leaders
A ventilator helps a COVID-19 patient breath inside the coronavirus unit in a Houston hospital on July 6, 2020.
David J. Phillip, Associated Press

Experts appear to agree that people can contract the novel coronavirus twice, despite earlier belief that wasn’t the case, according to USA Today.

What’s going on:

  • Experts said more testing will need to be done to prove whether or not people can get COVID-19 twice. And, if it’s possible, how many people can get it twice.
  • “The possibility of reinfection is certainly real. And one that I am seeing repeatedly on the front lines,” Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, told USA Today.
  • Glatter said he has cared for a “number of patients” who have tested negative for COVID-19 and only experienced mild symptoms, according to USA Today. Soon after, they’ll see a resurgence of symptoms. These patients said the second time around is worse than the first.
  • He said: “These patients develop difficulty breathing, leading to hypoxia, aches, chest pain, with recurrent and unrelenting fevers and chills.”
  • Dr. Daniel Griffin, chief of infectious diseases at ProHEALTH Care in New York, told USA Today: “We are months away from knowing for certain if reinfections are possible or a significant issue.”

Getting a second positive test:

  • In March, a report from the South China Morning Post suggested that 10% of patients in China tested positive for COVID-19 after getting discharged from the hospital.
  • Doctors said anywhere between 3% and 7% of patients were reinfected the virus, as I wrote for Deseret.com.
  • However, there was no data about whether the patients were contagious the second time.