clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Anti-mask protesters are wearing masks that don’t offer COVID-19 protection to prove their point

The protesters use masks made of mesh, yarn or lace

In this Thursday, July 2, 2020 file photo, a mannequin wears a face mask in the window of a store in Commerce, Calif. On Friday, July 10, 2020, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting that wearing a face mask for extended periods of time can cause pleurisy, an inflammation of the lining around the lung. Multiple experts told The Associated Press there is no medical evidence that wearing a face mask could lead to this condition.
In this Thursday, July 2, 2020 file photo, a mannequin wears a face mask in the window of a store in Commerce, Calif. On Friday, July 10, 2020, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting that wearing a face mask for extended periods of time can cause pleurisy, an inflammation of the lining around the lung. Multiple experts told The Associated Press there is no medical evidence that wearing a face mask could lead to this condition.
AP

Those against wearing masks have a new weapon — wearing masks that don’t offer any protection against COVID-19 when they head out into public.

So, yes. The anti-mask protesters are wearing masks to protest wearing masks.

According to WTHR in Indianapolis, supporters for the “anti-mask” movement are wearing masks that cover their noses and mouths. But the masks don’t stop air from getting out, meaning that they don’t stop the coronavirus from spreading.

A Florida man, Russ Ward, posted a video in which he wore one of these masks at a Tampa Walmart, according to Newsflare.

“I wore a mask that is designed for protecting your face in a paintball battle. You can easily breathe through it. I walked all around the store, talked to employees, and other shoppers, and every one of them could see my mouth,” he said, “It was almost like not wearing a mask at all. Nobody cared. That’s because it’s not about safety. It’s all about compliance.”

Similar social media posts reveal that people are, yes, wearing these mesh masks to comply with mandates and suggestions. But they don’t do much to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended people wear face masks or coverings to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Experts suggest wearing a mask can protect yourself from becoming infected with the coronavirus, too.

Mesh and yarn masks are now popular online, too. But they’re highly ineffective. According to recent research,

Dr. Christopher Belcher, the infection prevention medical director at Ascension St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis, told WTHR that people can protest against masks since that’s their right. But they should avoid putting others in danger.

“I need your help with this to keep from spreading the infection so the hospitals don’t get overrun,” he told WHTR. “If you’re going to go to the trouble of wearing a mask, please wear one that’s going to do something for other people. I don’t care if you write ‘NO’ on it. I don’t care if you have a T-shirt that says ‘I don’t want to wear this mask,’ but I need you to wear the mask. It’s an important thing for our health.”