Facebook Twitter

What happened to all those airplane nuts? Well, now we have an answer

Looking for some airplane or baseball nuts? They’re available

SHARE What happened to all those airplane nuts? Well, now we have an answer
In this July 6, 2018 photo, travelers check in for flights at the Delta Air Lines check-in counters at Beijing Capital International Airport. Chinese regulators said Thursday, June 4, 2020, that more foreign airlines will be allowed to fly to China as anti-coronavirus controls ease but it was unclear whether the change will defuse a fresh conflict with the Trump administration over air travel.

In this July 6, 2018, photo, travelers check in for flights at the Delta Air Lines check-in counters at Beijing Capital International Airport. Chinese regulators said Thursday, June 4, 2020, that more foreign airlines will be allowed to fly to China as anti-coronavirus controls ease.

Mark Schiefelbein, Associated Press

A company in Texas is selling nuts you’d typically buy on an airplane or at a baseball game — both of which are risky (if not unavailable) options for the current year.

That’s right. The GNS GreatNuts factory store in Texas roasts millions of nuts every year, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

But they’ve had less buyers because airlines are not giving them out and baseball games — a normal spot where you’d buy some peanuts (and Craacckkkerrr Jackssss) — aren’t allowing fans.

“I have 50,000 pounds of nuts American Airlines and United didn’t want!” Kim Peacock of GNS Foods andGreatNuts.com told The Star-Telegram. “We’re feeling sad. We’re sitting on a lot of nuts.”

“We’ve been asking American Airlines to help us get rid of these,” she said.

The store isn’t alone. AsFox Business reported, American farmers currently have a surplus of nuts due to international changes caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Farmers remain nervous because export prices are down but the crop yield went up because of the increasing demand, per Bloomberg.

“We’re nervous, especially for next year, with where prices are,” Bill Carriere, a farmer who works for the California Walnut Board and California Walnut Commission, told Bloomberg. “They could get below the cost of production.”