Facebook Twitter

These colors will be so in for 2021

What colors will be all in the fashion trends next year? Here’s a quick look

SHARE These colors will be so in for 2021
In this photo provided by Twentieth Century Fox , Meryl Streep’s character in “The Devil Wears Prada” flips through racks of designer clothes.

In this photo provided by Twentieth Century Fox , Meryl Streep’s character in “The Devil Wears Prada” flips through racks of designer clothes.

Associated Press

The Pantone Color Institutehas released its annual fashion color trend reportfor spring and summer 2021, revealing what colors will be in style when the pandemic (hopefully) ends.

What’s going on?

Pantone has revealed the top colors for fashion in 2021. These colors appear to be uplifting and cheery, a welcome sight from the dark and dreary days of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Offering a range of shades illustrative of nature, colors for spring/summer 2021 underscores our desire for flexible color that works year-round. Infused with a genuine authenticity that continues to be increasingly important, colors for spring/summer 2021 combine a level of comfort and relaxation with sparks of energy that encourage and uplift our moods. — Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute

Here’s a list of the colors:

  • Marigold
  • Cerulean
  • Rust
  • Illuminating yellow
  • French blue
  • Green ash
  • Burnt coral
  • Mint
  • Amethyst orchid
  • Raspberry sorbet
  • Inkwell
  • Ultimate gray
  • Buttercream
  • Desert mist
  • Willow

Oh, so you think this has nothing to do with you? Well, let me introduce you to “The Devil Wears Parada” and why the cerulean blue trend might impact what you wear.

OK, I see. You think this has nothing to do with you. You go to your closet and you select that lumpy, loose sweater, for instance, because you’re trying to tell the world that you take yourself too seriously to care about what you put on your back, but what you don’t know is that that sweater is not just blue. It’s not turquoise. It’s not lapis. It’s actually cerulean. And you’re also blithely unaware of the fact that in 2002, Oscar de la Renta did a collection of cerulean gowns, and then I think it was Yves Saint Laurent who showed cerulean military jackets, and then cerulean quickly shot up in the collections of eight different designers. And then it filtered down through department stores, and then trickled on down onto some tragic Casual Corner where you no doubt fished it out of some clearance bin. However, that blue represents millions of dollars and countless jobs, and it’s sort of comical how you think you made a choice that exempts you from the fashion industry when, in fact, you’re wearing a sweater that was selected for you by the people in this room from a pile of stuff.