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There are worries that the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict could become an ‘all out war.’ Here’s why

Casualties mount in Nagorno-Karabakh battle in a conflict that will matter to you.

SHARE There are worries that the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict could become an ‘all out war.’ Here’s why
A man looks through a broken window of a car damaged by shelling in Stepanakert, the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh, Azerbaijan, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. Armenian and Azerbaijani forces accused each other of attacks on their territory Tuesday, as fighting over the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh continued for a third straight day following the reigniting of a decades-old conflict.

A man looks through a broken window of a car damaged by shelling in Stepanakert, the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh, Azerbaijan, on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. Armenian and Azerbaijani forces accused each other of attacks on their territory Tuesday, as fighting over the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh continued for a third straight day following the reigniting of a decades-old conflict.

Areg Balayan, PAN Photo via AP

Close to 100 people have died in the ongoing conflict between Armenian and Azerbaijani, who are battling each other in the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region.

  • The location — which is officially a part of Azerbaijan — has been run by ethnic Armenians since 1994, BBC News reports.
  • The area has been a conflicted territory for years. The recent round of casualties might be the biggest since 2016.

The United Nations plans to announce a state of emergency over the recent struggles.

What’s the reaction?

Countries have already begun weighing in on the conflict.

“There are growing concerns that other countries may get directly involved in the conflict in the strategic Caucasus region,” according to BBC News.

  • So far, Turkey has backed Azerbaijan.
  • Russia has called for a cease-fire. But it has a military base in Armenia.

Why it matters:

The current battle has created “fears of an all-out war between two former Soviet republics,” Al Jazeera reports.

  • “We are a step away from a large-scale war,” said Olesya Vartanyan of the International Crisis Group, which looks to prevent large-scale conflicts, according to Al Jazeera.

Specifically, the Nagorno-Karabakh region works as an entrance point for pipelines for oil and gas to the world markets. Whatever happens there might have a longstanding impact for what happens throughout the world with oil and gas.

  • “It’s a region of international importance, which has actually grown more internationally important in the last 25 years because of oil and gas pipelines (going) through it,” Thomas de Waal, senior fellow with Carnegie Europe, toldAl Jazeera. “It’s a region that borders Iran and it’s in the European and Russian neighborhood, and the U.S. also got involved in the 1990s.”