Facebook Twitter

The 1918 flu is still with us today. You just might not realize it

The Washington Post has a new report about how the deadliest pandemic ever still impacts us in 2020.

SHARE The 1918 flu is still with us today. You just might not realize it
In this November 1918 photo made available by the Library of Congress, a nurse takes the pulse of a patient in the influenza ward of the Walter Reed hospital in Washington. Science has ticked off some major accomplishments over the last century.

In this November 1918 photo made available by the Library of Congress, a nurse takes the pulse of a patient in the influenza ward of the Walter Reed Hospital in Washington. Science has ticked off some major accomplishments over the last century.

Associated Press

We might never return to a fully new normal — a world without the novel coronavirus. Experts have spoken about that. But we may have to live with the virus in the same way we still feel the effects of the novel strand of influenza in 1918, according to The Washington Post.

Those who contracted the novel coronavirus developed immunity to it.

  • Life returned to normal in the 1920s.
  • The virus likely became less lethal.

But the flu didn’t disappear.

  • “The influenza virus continuously mutated, passing through humans, pigs and other mammals. The pandemic-level virus morphed into just another seasonal flu. Descendants of the 1918 H1N1 virus make up the influenza viruses we’re fighting today,” according to The Washington Post.

Ann Reid, the executive director of the National Center for Science Education, told The Washington Post: “The 1918 flu is still with us, in that sense. It never went away.”

  • Jeffery Taubenberger, an expert from National Institutes of Health, told The Washington Post: “All those pandemics that have happened since — 1957, 1968, 2009 — all those pandemics are derivatives of the 1918 flu. The flu viruses that people get this year, or last year, are all still directly related to the 1918 ancestor.”