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Here are the world’s 7 largest monoliths

The Utah monolith was discovered at the end of November 2020. But monoliths have existed for years. Here’s a look at the world’s largest monoliths

In this Feb. 20, 2019, file photo, fog covers the El Capitan landmark in Yosemite National Park, Calif.
In this Feb. 20, 2019, file photo, fog covers the El Capitan landmark in Yosemite National Park, Calif.
AP

The Utah monolith was discovered almost two months ago — but there have been plenty of monoliths throughout the world for decades, many of which are natural and much larger than what we see in the remote Utah wilderness.

Trying to find the world’s largest monolith takes a little time. Multiple lists defining the world’s largest natural monolith exist out there. While some locations cross over, there appears to be slight differences between them all.

Here’s a breakdown of the world’s largest natural monoliths, according to Touropia.

  1. Uluru/Ayers Rock (Australia)
  2. Zuma Rock (Nigeria)
  3. Sugarloaf Mountain (Rio De Janeiro)
  4. Sigiriya (Sri Lanka‎)
  5. Devils Tower (Wyoming)
  6. Ben Amera (Mauritania)
  7. Torres del Paine (Chile)

Of course, there are other lists you may want to check out since no one seems to agree about the world’s largest monolith. For example, The Travel had a top 10 list that reads as follows:

  1. Savandurga (India)
  2. El Capitan (California)
  3. Uluru (Australia)
  4. Zuma Rock (Nigeria)
  5. Stawamus Chief (Canada)
  6. Rock Of Gibraltar (British Overseas Territory)
  7. Ben Amera (Mauritania)

What it means

The Utah monolith — and all of the subsequent ones that popped up across the world — ignited heavy interest in monoliths. Trying to find the world’s largest one might be difficult, especially if you’re looking at natural ones. Still, it shows how wide and expansive the world is that such natural rock faces exist on our planet.