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COVID-19 vaccine patients report rare blood disorder. But there’s no proven link

At least 36 people reported a rare blood disorder from the coronavirus vaccine. Here’s what you need to know

In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020 file photo, blood samples from volunteers participating in the last-stage testing of the COVID-19 vaccine by Moderna and the National Institutes wait to be processed in a lab at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Miami. Close to 36 people reported a rare blood disorder from the coronavirus vaccine.
In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, blood samples from volunteers participating in the last-stage testing of the COVID-19 vaccine by Moderna and the National Institutes wait to be processed in a lab at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Miami. About 36 people reported a rare blood disorder from the coronavirus vaccine.
Taimy lvarez, Associated Press

At least 36 people have developed a rare blood disorder after taking either the Pfizer and BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, according to The New York Times.

  • The disorder is called immune thrombocytopenia, which leads to a lack of “platelets,” which are “cells that are essential for making blood clot, a process that stops you from continually bleeding from the site of an injury,” according to Newsweek.

What’s going on?

The U.S. government’s Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System has seen 36 cases of the disorder since the end of January, according to The New York Times. Each of the cases involved either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines.

  • “But the reporting system shows only problems described by health care providers or patients after vaccination, and does not indicate whether the shots actually caused the problems,” according to The New York Times.
  • “It is not known whether this blood disorder is related to the COVID vaccines,” according to The New York Times.
  • Per Fox News, there were no cases of thrombocytopenia reported during the COVID-19 vaccine trials from Moderna and Pfizer.

Response

The Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are both looking into the reports. Right now, the rates reported among those vaccinated isn’t higher than those found in the U.S. population.

  • Per Newsweek, the Platelet Disorder Support Association said about 100,000 people in the U.S. have the condition.

A Pfizer spokesperson told Fox News it is “aware of cases of thrombocytopenia in recipients of our COVID-19 vaccine” and is taking the reports “very seriously.”

  • “We are collecting relevant information to share with the FDA. However, at this time, we have not been able to establish a causal association with our vaccine,” the spokesperson added. “To date, millions of people have been vaccinated and we are closely monitoring all adverse events in individuals receiving our vaccine. Serious adverse events, including deaths that are unrelated to the vaccine, are unfortunately likely to occur at a similar rate as they would in the general population.”

Anything else?

The CDC has said that the coronavirus vaccine is totally safe and side effects are normal.

  • “COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days.”