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New California coronavirus variant is spreading really fast, study says

A new study from the University of California, San Francisco says the coronavirus variant in California is spreading fast

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Motorists line up a COVID-19 vaccination site at California State University Northridge Monday, Feb. 8, 2021, in Northridge, Calif.

Motorists line up a COVID-19 vaccination site at California State University Northridge Monday, Feb. 8, 2021, in Northridge, Calif. A new study from the University of California, San Francisco says a coronavirus variant in California is spreading fast.

Marcio Jose Sanchez, Associated Press

The novel coronavirus variant originally discovered in California has been spreading rapidly in the state, raising questions about how the vaccines will defeat it, according to The Los Angeles Times.

What’s going on?

A new study from the University of California, San Francisco, said the new variant has spread over the last few weeks, per NBC Bay Area.

  • Cases have been especially prevalent among the Latino community.
  • “We are the majority of the workforce that’s helping keep not just the city running but this country running,” Jon Jacobo of the San Francisco’s COVID-19 Latino Task Force told NBC Bay Area. “And that is why we see these disproportionate levels of infection.”

UCSF infectious disease specialist Dr. Peter Chin-Hong told NBC Bay Area that the new variant isn’t as transmissible as those found in the United Kingdom, South Africa or Brazil. But it is moving fast through the community.

  • “It just means that we can’t let our guard down too much,” Hong said.

Per The Mercury News, the new variant has been found in more than half of all samples taken from COVID-19 patients.

Flashback

Back in January, a study suggested that more than one-third of the recent COVID-19 patients in California were infected with another new strain of COVID-19, as I wrote about for the Deseret News.

  • California saw a major spike in COVID-19 cases during the fall and early winter, causing Southern California to become an epicenter of the pandemic, which I wrote about for the Deseret News.