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New study reveals new ways COVID-19 symptoms impact children

A large study reveals there are differences in how children become ill from COVID-19

In this Aug. 3, 2020, file photo, Paul Adamus, 7, waits at the bus stop for the first day of school in Dallas, Ga.
Paul Adamus, 7, waits at the bus stop for the first day of school in Dallas, Ga., on Aug. 3, 2020. A new study suggests there are major differences in the two ways children become severely ill from COVID-19
Brynn Anderson, Associated Press

A new study suggests there are major differences in the two ways children become severely ill from COVID-19, The New York Times reports.

  • The findings “may help doctors and parents better recognize the conditions and understand more about the children at risk for each one,” according to The New York Times.

What does the study say?

The study — published in the medical journal JAMA — looked at 1,116 cases of young people who were treated in 66 hospitals in 31 states.

About half the patients had COVID-19 similar to adults. The other half had multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children or MIS-C, the syndrome that has hit children nationwide due to COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic.

  • Per ABC News: “MIS-C is a condition where different body parts like the heart, lungs, brain, skin, eyes and kidneys can become inflamed. The condition occurs in children who have been infected with COVID-19.”

The study found those with MIS-C were more likely to be 6 to 12 years old. More than 80% of patients with the regular COVID-19 diagnosis were younger than 6 or older than 12, per The New York Times.

  • And more than two-thirds of patients were either Black or Hispanic, according to The New York Times.
  • Those with MIS-C were more likely to not have an underlying health condition.
  • According to WFLA, those with MIS-C tended to have more severe symptoms overall. Those patients were more likely to need treatment from intensive care units, too.

Bigger picture

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it is monitoring whether or not COVID-19 variants can create more cases of MIS-C.

  • “All I can say right now is we don’t know,” said Dr. Angela Campbell, a CDC medical officer with the Influenza Division, according to CNN.

For now, children still can’t get the COVID-19 vaccine, per Today.com.

  • “The timeline for when kids of all ages will have access to the COVID-19 vaccines is still in flux and will depend on when the data from these trials is released,” according to Today.com.