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The UK variant of coronavirus might not create this symptom

Those who were infected with the UK variant reported their symptoms, and a key one was missing

A woman wearing a mask against coronavirus walks past a neon sign display at the Wellcome Institute in London, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2021. A new study suggests cases of the new UK COVID-19 variant are doubling every 10 days.
A woman wearing a mask against coronavirus walks past a neon sign display at the Wellcome Institute in London, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2021. Those who were infected with the U.K. variant reported their symptoms, and a key one was missing.
Associated Press

One of the key COVID-19 symptoms might not be present for those who were infected with the United Kingdom variant of the virus, according to a new survey.

What’s going on?

A new survey from the United Kingdom — created by University of Oxford, University of Manchester, Public Health England and Wellcome Trust — discovered that there might be a difference in symptoms from those who have COVID-19 from a normal variant and the new variant.

  • The U.K. variant patients were less likely to report loss of taste and smell compared to those with the normal variant, according to the survey.
  • More frequent cough, sore throat, fatigue and myalgia were reported for those with the U.K. variant, too.

Why it matters

Cardiologist Dr. Hafiza Khan told NBC DFW that this news could deter people from thinking they have COVID-19. Khan said people need to remain vigilant.

  • “Many people feel that if they can still smell and they can still taste, then it can’t be COVID-19,” she told NBC DFW. “So if someone is experiencing fever, sore throat, achiness, but they can still taste and they can still smell, as the new variant becomes prevalent in the U.S., they should reach out to their physician and consider getting a COVID-19 test.”

New variants on the way

The novel coronavirus variant originally discovered in the United Kingdom has mutated again, researchers recently told BBC News. The U.K. variant has undergone “worrying” new changes, scientists told BBC News, which might help the virus evade antibodies.

  • “It’s developed a superpower. This is a mutation in the South African variant that seems not only help it infect cells but also to evade the immune system,” Sky News correspondent Thomas Moore said, according to The Express. “The reason being that spike protein that all the COVID viruses use to latch onto humans cells changes shapes and that means the antibodies don’t recognise it in quite the same way.”